25 7 / 2014

animationproclamations:

Helen Kane and Betty Boop. “Photoplay,” April 1932.

animationproclamations:

Helen Kane and Betty Boop. “Photoplay,” April 1932.

25 7 / 2014

gameraboy:

Mad science. From the 1941 Max Fleischer Superman serials.

25 7 / 2014

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS >|< Finding His Voice (1929)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: Western Electric Company, Inc.
 | Download: Ogg | 512Kb MPEG4 | MPEG2
 | Digital Copy: public domain


A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Finding His Voice: a cartoon showing how sound motion pictures work, produced by a company that was an innovator in the field. Story by W.E. Erpi (pseudonym for Western Electric, Electrical Research Products Inc.). Directors: F. Lyle Goldman and Max Fleischer.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE.




EXCERPTS by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/unknown/rare/controversial moving images. 
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

>|<

25 7 / 2014

(Source: blenzz)

25 7 / 2014

gameraboy:

Lois doesn’t have time for this @#$!  From Max Fleischer’s Superman (1941)

25 7 / 2014

(Source: solomonscane)

25 7 / 2014

bettybooplover:

Betty Boop: Oh! (Jumps into Inkwell)

Betty Boop: Well Mr Reporter did ya get everything huh?

Dave Fleischer: Yes… “Eye" got everything!

Betty Boop: Hahaha!  Well so long everybody!

25 7 / 2014

decadentiacoprofaga:

Some Fleischer Studio gold brought to us by Cartoon Brew.

25 7 / 2014

animationtidbits:

Superman (Fleischer) - Backgrounds

(Source: one1more2time3.wordpress.com)

25 7 / 2014

thechronologicalsuperman:

The Bulleteers
“Superman” Theatrical Cartoons - March 27, 1942

Even moreso than the old theatrical Looney Tunes and Mickey Mouse cartoons, which relied heavily on sight gags, the Fleischer Studio Superman cartoons are some of the most visually dense animated shorts in the history of the medium. For the last several generations of Westerners who have grown up on cycled animation, re-used clips and backgrounds, lowered frame rates, static faces and gag or dialogue driven cartoons, the old Superman series presents a genuinely cinematic experience.

Although you will miss out on the full experience, it’s possible to watch animated shows like Archer, The Simpsons, The Venture Brothers, et al, and periodically look away from the screen without missing the essence of the story. The Superman cartoons, however – and the Bulleteers being a prime example – rely almost entirely on the visuals to communicate the action and atmosphere. Imagine missing not only the sight of the Bulleteer’s deadly vehicle smashing buildings in vibrant explosions, but the looming spectacle of the loudspeaker booming out over Metropolis from the precarious mountain lair, the cathedral ceilings of City Hall, the shadowbox scale of the police scattering before the oncoming missile of doom …